fit-state-of-mind:

tillyouandiseethesun:

this isn’t even a problem

This is how I envision hogwarts homework being done

(Source: youtube.com, via dont-panic-zoology)

eruditionanimaladoration:

Good boy mate.

eruditionanimaladoration:

Good boy mate.

funnywildlife:

Kids will be kids!

funnywildlife:

Kids will be kids!

el-h0mbre:

eatfithappiness:

epic-humor:

Animals Growing Up

Cuz who wouldn’t want this on their dash

MY HEart JFC

(Source: tastefullyoffensive, via eruditionanimaladoration)

aqueoustransmission:

thatgirlcanlift:

wreckedxteen:

canna-bish:

Thank you so fucking much.

im in teaaars

I will never not reblog this because this guy right here is the best example you could ever have for how to care for an animal in need.

All the tears

All of ‘em

(Source: cute-overload, via funnywildlife)

aquaristlifeforme:

I love baby Skates!! This was too cute not to reblog.

aquaristlifeforme:

I love baby Skates!! This was too cute not to reblog.

(Source: cranberry-vulcan)

sdzsafaripark:

First photo of our adorable 6-week-old cheetah cub, Ruuxa. 

sdzsafaripark:

First photo of our adorable 6-week-old cheetah cub, Ruuxa. 

(via sdzoo)

4gifs:

The water is lava. [video]

4gifs:

The water is lava. [video]

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

ted:

The amazing problem-solving skills of crows — measured by science!

Here, one of these smarty-pants birds is being put to the ultimate test: get a basket of food out of an upright cylinder with a single straight wire. And get it she does, in a feat of intuitive problem solving.

Want to know why crows are so smart? Check out this talk from TEDxRainier by bird researcher John Marzluff, on the wildly fascinating intricacies of the bird brain. (Take that one out of your insult bucket.)

Watch the talk here » 

P.S. Do not skip 14:38, when you get to hear a crow speak English.

(via eruditionanimaladoration)

Whale Necropsy

arsanatomica:

Recently, I had the opportunity to observe and help out with a whale necropsy.

image

This young female humpback whale was less two years old, when it died and floated ashore. A necropsy was performed in attempt to determine the cause of death.

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A large cut is made to the throat to free gases trapped in the throat pouch, and allow it to deflate. In life, the pleated throat pouch in baleen whales can expand enormously to accommodate sea water.  In death, it often fills with gas as the body decomposes. 

image

These are Humpback Whale Barnacles (Coronula diadema). They are only found on the throats and bellies of humpback whales,

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A series of cuts penetrate the thick blubber layer, and allow it to be peeled back to reveal the underlying tissue. 

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The tissue beneath the blubber on the pectoral area, or shoulder area, is abnormally dark. This hemorrhaging, or bruising, is indicative of blunt force trauma in that area. 

Large animal necropsies are tricky. Often, the exact cause of death is difficult to pinpointed because the animal is too large to manipulated for a detailed look on all areas. Some ribs and vertebrae were removed, but without any fractures, It’s difficult to say what caused the trauma. Ships and other whales are both possibilities. 

I’ve never touched a whale. I always thought whales felt hard like rubber tires, and was surprised to find that they’re fleshy and somewhat soft, and feel a little like thick gel mousepads, or those keyboard wrist support strips that you find in offices.

(via zoodvminthemaking)

sheerdarwinism:

Everyone loves little wombat joeys, right?

This little wombat is named Sydney, and she’s just left her mother’s pouch at Taronga Zoo, where she’ll be seen by millions of people each year.

Southern Hairy-nosed Wombats are notoriously difficult to breed - females are only receptive to males for 12 hours a year, in Spring, but mother Korra and father Noojee appear to get along rather well, as Sydney is their second joey in three years.

Zookeepers only discovered Sydney’s presence about five months ago, when she stuck her hind foot out of her mother’s pouch. But now, at about the size of a football (an AFL football, that is), Sydney is too unwieldy to remain in the pouch, and has started exploring.

And while she’s cute and all, the real exciting thing is the implications this successful breeding might have for the critically endangered Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat, of which there is only about 200 wild individuals left. There’s currently no breeding program for the Northern species, but this program may be able to be perfected and adapted, and applied, allowing zoos a better chance of conserving them in the future.

Photo Credit: Paul Fahy | National Geographic

(Source: australiangeographic.com.au, via dont-panic-zoology)

crab-hand:

chucks the ball over his head, is surprised by the result

crab-hand:

chucks the ball over his head, is surprised by the result

(via the-vegan-muser)