Hello.

Happy Easter.

I thought it only made sense to do a spotlilght on a bun-bun today.

So, this bun-bun is a Giant Flemish Rabbit!

IT’S SO FLUFFY I’M GONNA DIE!

Is the picture just blown up to make it seem this big, you ask. No. This is a for real life giant rabbit.

The Flemish Giant is native to a Flanders in Belgium, a county full of plains and valleys and rivers. This giant rabbit is perfectly suited for the 37° winters and 70° summers with a thick –super, super soft – pelt. Back in the day (the 1860’s, when people realized there was a huge rabbit in Belgium) these gentle giants only came in one color: grey, with sandy colored ears. Which makes sense, if you think about it, because Flanders also has some rocky alcoves and caves… which are grey, because they are made of rocks.

Anyway, these rabbits can reach 20 pounds – some even reach 30 pounds! – and average around 2½ feet long; they’re called Giants for a reason. Why so big, you ask? I see you’re very curious, on this Easter Sunday. Well, these rabbits were bred (again, back in the day) with other large rabbits for meat and fur. And, because we know so much about rabbits – in about a month you could have anywhere from 5 to 12 baby giants. These little giants will become actual giants within 9 months to a year, reaching about 14 pounds. So, it was a good investment to have a bunch of rabbits around in Flanders in the 1800’s, because they were a great source of food and fur.

These rabbits are a bit high maintenance, though. Having since been domesticated (yes, that means you can own them*) it’s been found that they can have a hard time grooming as they get older due to their large size. With that, it is possible that they can develop mats, which are detrimental in the long run. They have a powerful jump, too, so when they are picked up and want to be put down and try to jump away, the force behind that kick can sometimes be so hard, it breaks their spine.

I’m not trying to scare you away from owning this giant if you want one. They are so cute and have great personalities (I know 3 of these rabbits, and they’re all awesome), but rabbits in general are a lot of work. I mention this on Easter because I know sometimes people give little baby bunnies as presents. I would please advise you not to do so. They are small for about a week to two weeks, and then they get huge (all rabbits in general), they have long claws that they love to dig with and they need to gnaw on something always because their teeth are constantly growing. And, overall, they are not a snuggly animal…

They do make great pets, though – if you’ve got the time, the space and the patience… just… not for Easter.

This is a Brazilian Rainbow Boa.

Guess where it’s from.

If you guessed Brazil – you’re absolutely correct! The Brazilian Rainbow Boa is found in Central and South America – including Brazil. Continuing with the name, ‘Rainbow’ – it’s got that part in its name because of the iridescent sheen the scales give. It’s sort of like how oil is so pretty on the ground in a big parking lot, or how – on a snake – it can make them look like wet leaves; which is very convenient because the places I mentioned above are full of humid woodland forests. So comfy.

They can get to be about five to six feet – that doesn’t mean that they won’t top out around four feet… or exceed that by reaching seven feet in length. Length isn’t the only thing that’s long about these snakes. They have been known to reach ages around 25 years, some even longer – reaching about a half a century!

All in all, a little cutie.

umfag:

watsoniananatomy:

thebigcatblog:

A 22-month-old female scaredy cat tiger appeared to get the shock of her young life when she encountered a dead leaf floating on a pool of water in the Bandhavgarh National Park, India. Clearly unusure about just what was approaching her, the partially submerged youngster’s tail shot up in the air and with teeth bared she let out her most fearsome growl - all in an effort to scare the humble leaf away.
Picture: HERMANN BREHM / NPL / Rex Features

I CAN’T BREATHE

aAAAW

umfag:

watsoniananatomy:

thebigcatblog:

A 22-month-old female scaredy cat tiger appeared to get the shock of her young life when she encountered a dead leaf floating on a pool of water in the Bandhavgarh National Park, India. Clearly unusure about just what was approaching her, the partially submerged youngster’s tail shot up in the air and with teeth bared she let out her most fearsome growl - all in an effort to scare the humble leaf away.

Picture: HERMANN BREHM / NPL / Rex Features

I CAN’T BREATHE

aAAAW

(via eruditionanimaladoration)

lulz-time:

Featured on a 1000Notes.com blog

(Source: abigatorness, via kaideeaiych)

sixsteen:

if u feel sad right now look at this bunny eating a flower

image

image

(via kaideeaiych)

This is a Kookaburra.

You know the one…

Kookaburra laughs in the old gum tree.

Yep.

This is it.

These, the largest member of kingfisher family, are found in the eucalyptus forests of Australia. If you ever plan on wandering these forests, just wait until about early dawn or dusk, and you’ll be able to hear what has been called a “cackling laugh”. In fact, because of their wonderful cackle at such specific times they have been called the bushman’s clock – letting everyone in Australia know what time it is.

Like I said earlier, the kookaburra is a member of the kingfisher family – which leads to the assumption that it eats fish. That would be correct of kingfishers. With their four-inch long pointed beak, the kookaburra does not carefully crack seeds of peel grapes. No, the kookaburra eats invertebrates and vertebrates – including small snakes and mice. They are so far from seeds and nuts birds, that they have become a nuisance to farmers because the kookaburra preys on the farmers’ fowl.

When kookaburras find love, they keep within their pairs – that is to say, they are monogamous. When it’s time for babies (so exciting!) the female can lay from one to five eggs. And what’s pretty neat, the fledgling kookaburras will actually hang around their parents nest to take care of the following chicks.

Family is important for these chuckle-heads.

2048: Zoo Keeper Edition

zooborns:

Tree Kangaroo is Taronga’s First in 20 Years

Australia’s Taronga Zoo is celebrating the successful birth of its first Goodfellow’s Tree Kangaroo joey in more than 20 years! The female joey has just begun peeking out of her mom’s pouch.

Read more at Zooborns.

(via c0ttontailsnscales)

hoovesandheartbeats:

This is a juvenile Procyon lotor aka the common Raccoon. This little fella came to us after being found during a home renovation and was separated for it’s mother.  In the best of cases we like to reunite orphans with their mothers, but given it would be hard to convince clients to allow a baby raccoon back into their home, we nursed this guy up to health and sent him to a wildlife rehabbed were he was later released as an adolescent. 

Baby raccoons are often cute and cuddly, but don’t let them deceive you, they have this magical age line.  The second they come into adolescence they become people eating machines.  

I would like to add: most wild “orphans” are not orphans, so please do not approach these animals.  If you suspect an animal is an orphan observe it for a day, most likely the mother is off, away from the young. Wildlife parents aren’t helicopter parents, they have things to do during the day. 

 

(via c0ttontailsnscales)

funnywildlife:

Love

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via 4gifs)